Author Topic: Review - The Goose - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.  (Read 150535 times)

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Skorj

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Review - The Goose - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« on: August 11, 2007, 01:21:05 PM »
Removable back, interchangeable lenses, what more could you want from a Polaroid camera? Errr? How about a gross weight something less than the Queen Mary?


Polaroid 600 SE `Professional` - The Goose - and how to shoot ISO6 rated exposures - yurgh!

However, if you want to ditch your automatic, and want something that allows full manual control over your Polaroid photography, a Goose (6 0 0 S E) is a viable alternative to the 180/190/195 series of manual cameras.

The 600 SE has a great bright-image, coincident rangefinder, with adjustable framelines for the native 127mm and 150mm lenses. Three lenses are available:

    * 75mm f5.6 (`wide`), with auxiliary viewfinder.
    * 127mm f4.7.
    * 150mm f5.6 (`portrait`).

The 150mm being the least sought after, is relatively cheap, and the 75mm - probably because of the finder-combo need - the most expensive. I`ve not seen or heard of any other lenses fitting the SE body. Note the difference between the 600 SE and the plain-jane 600 is the lens interchangeability.

150mm.

75mm.

Lens comparison photographs follow, all shot with Fuji FP-400B (f16 at 1/60s), on nothing much more interesting than my street (or one a few streets away if you`re an Internet stalker), as I could not be bothered lugging three lenses anywhere further - did I mention everything is very heavy?

75mm.

127mm.

150mm (and my neighbor).

While the 75mm has half the focal length of the 150mm, it lacks the wide wideness I was after, being something just under a 30mm in a 35mm-format equivalent scale. Still, each lens has enough individuality, and one or two should make any SE shooter happy.

From the US catalog:



Modern Nihon 45. Sometimes, the 75mm wide is just enough. Expired Type-665, f5,6 and 1/60, with a three-stop orange filter, or something like that anyway.

The 75mm aux finder, with its curious parallax compensation dial (which tilts the finder, from parallel to down as the focus gets closer), is accurate and represents the film image very well.

Aux Finder.

None of the 600 SE lenses are as fast as the 195`s f3.8, but this is small loss of functionality compared to the benefits of the multi-lens system, and being able to swap film types mid-shoot.



I do miss the depth-of-field the 195 makes at f3.8, but with ISO400 and ISO3000 B&W film freely available, the speed loss is not too much of an issue.

The SE can also be fitted with 120-format back, and the holy grail, a sheet film adapter (such as the 545/545i/545pro), this was to allow me to continue to shoot Polaroid pos/neg film, as Type-55 was to be perhaps made longer than my otherwise favorite Type-665, but that never happened. The sheet film adapter can of course be used for other single load combinations.

Back spacer sets (in two lengths), and a ground glass back are also available for macro work:


As are some 127mm lens compatible diopters:


Mamiya Universal spacer set, still trying to find the 600SE equivalent:




Mamiya `M` adapter with Mamiya Roll-Film Back. 120 only for an obvious reason, with 6x4.5, 6x6 and 6x9 capability. Slider for frame counter red windows and appropriate mask set.

As well a a few types of 4x5 sheet film backs fitting the `M` adapter, also available is a straight 120/220 6x9 roll-film back fitting the same `M` adapter:





600SE and Native Mamiya Back Spacer & Ground Glass Screen Set.


How to make a heavier Goose - add the macro spacer set and ground glass focus screen...


545i Back.

Not full-frame onto 4x5, but close.

It does not accept square format pack film, like the 195 does, only rectangular stuff (from Fuji or Polaroid). Flash-synching of some sort is available too, but I do not use that.

It also has two tripod mounts, one for portrait and one for landscape orientation. This is needed, as tilting your tripod head horizontal with the SE sitting sideways, is a sure way to break even Manfrotto carbon legs - the SE is that heavy.

Tripod Mounts.

No metering is provided. If you`re going to carry one around, make sure you`ve got one of those nice fat foam carry straps, as the SE can sometimes feel quite heavy.

Thick frame lines contribute to weight.

Problems? Did I mention it weighs a lot?

Changing backs in the field is an OK process, but with my set being the later model (with the external plastic catch), not the early (internal wire catch), the catch can get caught on bag/pants/zippers on the way to the camera, and this results in - invariably- a full pack of film being scattered across the floor of someone`s bedroom.


A lost neko lay down on the tatami to die in the cold alone. Type-665. (75mm).

The back locks can be a little stiff sometimes, and are certainly not as smooth as the Mamiya Universal on which the 600 SE is based. They do however lack the locking function - which I`ve never found as a problem. A light lube fixes sticky back locks in a flash.

The 600 SE back mount is not unique, and can also be found on other removable back cameras such as the Mini Portrait, and the Studio Express (4-lens) - both a useful source of spare backs as these passport photograph cameras are considered junk by many. The mount is similar to the Mamiya Universal, but the backs are not interchangeable.

600 SE Mount.

Mamiya Universal Mount.

Be careful if you are buying a Mini Portrait or Studio Express for spare backs though, as some early Mini Portraits have Graflock backs, as do some two-lensed Studio Express.

Lens interchangeability is a snap, with the bayonet lock & mount smooth and accurate. Rethreading the pistol grip`s shutter release cable can be fiddly, especially with a lens hoods mounted. As I quite like a bit of flare, and because of this, I`ve ditched my hoods.

Forgetting to remove the dark slide is of course an issue for those not used to this function as part of your shooting routine. `Remove-before-flight` hanging tags eliminated this issue for me.

Full System.


With ash from the volcano falling all around we stopped for gas and a quick drink. Expired Type-665, and 75mm.


Modern Nihon. Expired Type-665, and 150mm.

The 600 SE was also a well configured system for scientific and instrument purposes. As well as the macro spacer set, two types of oscilloscope hoods, and macro lens-loupes were also available. Note use of trigger-grip flange to secure un-used shutter release cable while remote release used. This is necessary too when shooting long exposures to ensure use of trigger-grip does not shake camera, and un-used release cable does not float around in front of the lens.


From the scientific accessory catalog - the macro-focusing stand, spacer, and ground-glass focusing screen combo.


Oscilloscope hood in use with 75mm wide. It attaches with a simple filter-like screw-in plastic flange to lens filter thread.


Diopter on 127mm, and light spacer for fixed distance exposures.

With the back mounts readily available, the system also lends itself to various kludges, and hybrids. Want a manual, full-frame, 600-series and / or SX-70, Impossible Project camera goodness? With wide capabilities? Sure:



Just add a 600-series back to a 600SE mount:




For that classic integral film look, with full manual control - original Polaroid 600-series (like these), SX-70 (if you can get it), or that new fangled Impossible Project stuff:





Summary: a very versatile system, sure to build muscles in any street photographer, and probably more suited to a studio as a proofing camera. A great built-to-last tool, and one I probably use more than any other of my Polaroids because of its purposeful modular versatility. Of all the components I've run through in exploring the 600 SE system, the main elements that I use most are:
o A few interchangeable, pre-labeled backs ('Type-665', 'ISO3000', and 'Color').
o 75mm and 150mm lenses (ditched the 127mm).
o Three-stop orange filter for some neat sky effects.
o Stand-alone light-meter.

If you are lucky, studio sets can be picked up for relatively cheap. This set of three (excluding the Universal) were sold on as one lot from a studio in Nagoya. The Universal is of course an alternative to a Goose, but most will be a few years older still than the oldest 600 SE.


More results can be seen CLICK HERE. Arigato.  

« Last Edit: October 30, 2011, 03:49:42 AM by Skorj »

kucharo

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Re: The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2007, 11:04:03 PM »
Thanks Skorj-san! I love my 600SE so much, and I owe it all to you!

Typhoon

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2007, 04:19:06 PM »
This review is fantastic.  I have a 600SE which I love and use a lot.  My favourite film is type 665 which of course, as everyone knows, isn't made any more and is becoming VERY hard to find - I had to drop out of the bidding fairly early on on the last batch of 3 packs that came up for auction on "that auction website" as the price was getting way too high.  I would love to use type 55 as an alternative, even though the future for that type isn't exactly rosy (maybe we can hope to get it for a couple more years) but simply cannot find out with certainty what equipment I have to get, if any, IN ADDITION  to a film holder as shown in the picture in your review (is it a 545 back?  I can't view your review as I write due to being in the reply window).  Do I need some kind of adaptor which slots in between the camera body and the type 55 film back or does the back mate directly with the body of the 600SE?

Any further clear explanation of what is needed would be SO MUCH appreciated - I will then decide if the cost is justifiable (I am a complete amateur (in more ways than one!) by the way), measured against the likely future availability of type 55

And finally, the tip about lightly lubricating the locking clips is useful; mine are somewhat stiff and you can really give yourself a temporary dead finger if you do not take care as you lock and unlock.

Many thanks again.

Skorj

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2007, 03:41:59 AM »
Do I need some kind of adaptor which slots in between the camera body and the type 55 film back or does the back mate directly with the body of the 600SE?


Good question, and one it took me ages to work out myself. The answer is `no`; as you have to add a standard 600 SE mount (taken from any old 600 SE pack-film back) to a 545 back. This is what NPC and a few others did a while ago. It seems no one is doing this commercially any more, so you are left with either buying a second-hand one (USD250 plus), or making one yourself.

The following photographs demonstrate, as making one yourself is the same result as the commercial unit. Note the only process not apparent from the photographs is the need to slim down the hardware taken from a normal 600 SE mount (take about about 3mm off to ensure film planes match). Luckily this is done to the depth of the internal flange. To do this, a belt sander would be ideal.

Original screws, and a smear of black silicone finish the job off:






Easy!
« Last Edit: June 20, 2009, 06:15:53 AM by Skorj »

traskblueribbon

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2008, 11:42:40 PM »
so dose anyone know of ability or inability to mount universal lenses to the SE? I hear its possible via word of mouth of a local camera guru but have found little else to support this claim.
I sure would like some more choices for my SE... Like shift!

Francois

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2008, 10:23:24 PM »
From what I've read, Mamiya had a different bayonet mount for both cameras.
So no compatibility... sorry.
Francois

Film is the vinyl record of photography.

Skorj

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #6 on: February 02, 2008, 10:21:35 AM »
so does anyone know of ability or inability to mount universal lenses to the SE?


Nope. As Francois suggests, no can do. The Universal uses a three pronged mount (I think), the 600 SE a four pronged mount. Assuming the focus cam and diameter are the same, you may be able to swap the bayonet ring... Note 'P' suffixed Universal lenses are Polaroid pack-film compatible, giving fuller frame coverage over the non-P type:


The Universal range, applied to the 600SE would certainly give you a wider range of lens choices (the 50mm being particularly thought provoking):



« Last Edit: January 02, 2010, 03:26:17 PM by Skorj »

Francois

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2008, 10:01:50 PM »
Maybe you could find something at http://www.zoerk.com/

They make some pretty strange adapters...
But at their prices, might as well buy a used Mamiya...
Francois

Film is the vinyl record of photography.

jramon

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #8 on: April 01, 2009, 10:00:33 AM »
Thanks ... I am looking for a way to get closer to a subject, handheld, without cropping.   Polaroids, even Fuji, are not exactly cheap these days :-).  Other than that, I like the 600SE a lot, for it's versatility.

Just looked at the Mamiya Press but looks like it still won't give me what I want, not sure about the 250mm. 

Anyway, will be looking around for something similar to the 600SE's functionality.


« Last Edit: April 01, 2009, 11:40:51 AM by jramon »

Skorj

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #9 on: April 01, 2009, 01:46:54 PM »
Just looked at the Mamiya Press but looks like it still won't give me what I want, not sure about the 250mm. 

Press with extension rings perhaps? How much telephoto do you want?

jramon

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #10 on: April 01, 2009, 02:35:29 PM »
Thanks ... well, being an RF, that would mean a focusing screen, so a tripod will be needed, and the subject unmoving while putting back the back.   All I want is a closer head and shoulders shot, with a 4x5 Polaroid or MF.  Just a bit closer more on the 127mm and it would have been perfect.

But the more I look, there seems to be nothing like a Polaroid 600SE/Mamiya Press out there.  There are some small LFs but they still don't have the ergonomics of an SLR. 

Anyway, can't have them all  I guess,  I can still use it for other images other than the closer shot.  Just ordered some Quickload Fuji from Japan Exposures ... you have a lot of film over there in Japan :-)

Skorj

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #11 on: April 01, 2009, 11:52:31 PM »
Just a bit closer more on the 127mm and it would have been perfect.

For me, that is the 150mm. One of the two lenses I use, that and the 75mm make up my set. Skj.

jramon

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #12 on: April 02, 2009, 03:30:59 AM »
I see ... the 150mm was what naturally came to my mind, which is a portrait focal length at least with Hasselblad.  And for Polaroid, I want to shoot more people than other stuff.

After reading what Tony Sansone said here (http://photo.net/medium-format-photography-forum/00PmYU), and the Shutterbug review (http://shutterbug.com/equipmentreviews/classic_historical/0904sb_classic/index1.html), I forgot about the 150mm.   Anyway, I will just get the 150mm, it still should help even if it is only essentially approx. 55mm in 35mm terms.

Thanks
« Last Edit: April 02, 2009, 03:39:44 AM by jramon »

SoonerBJJ

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #13 on: January 02, 2010, 03:52:37 AM »
This is a great review.  I've been shooting with a 600SE that I bought at least partially thanks to this thread.

Currently I'm only using the 127mm lense but plan to add the 75mm soon.  Question... where might one find red or orange filters to fit the 127mm?

Thanks in advance.

Skorj

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Re: Polaroid 600SE Filter Sizes?
« Reply #14 on: January 02, 2010, 10:18:03 AM »
I've been shooting with a 600SE that I bought at least partially thanks to this thread.

Question... where might one find red or orange filters to fit the 127mm?


Hey, that's great! The filter sizes for the 600SE are:
o The 75mm lens takes a 72mm filter.
o 127mm lens a 55mm.
o 150mm a 55mm too.

I use a YA3 (3-stop yellow) for the cloud / sky effects you see here, which I think is the generally accepted color for black-and-white sky contrast enhancement, as it closely approximates the Y-filters issued by Polaroid for such purposes (I took a 195 OEM 'Sky Filter' to match in the shop). Not sure a red will have the same effect on Polaroid (or Fuji) as it does on conventional B&W films. Also, I do not use the YA3 for portrait work as it is just too contrasty for nice gray tones needed on skin.

Many camera stores should stock the YA-3 in sizes needed, if not I am sure some nice person on the Interwebs would be more than happy to sell you one... I bought Kenko YA-3s for my 75mm and 150mm from BIC Camera Shibuya.

Note too, though a YA-3, I sometimes find an ambient 2-stop correction better in really bright light over a full 3-stops. Ambient metered skies always take a 3-stop correction, if you're shooting just the sky that is. Good luck! Skj.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2010, 11:17:37 AM by Skorj »

SoonerBJJ

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #15 on: January 02, 2010, 05:02:06 PM »
Thanks, Skorj.  More great info.

Since this thread is becoming a definitive source on the 600SE, do you have any experience with the Hoya diopter kit?  The proprietary close up spacers have been fetching quite a premium at Ebay lately so it seems the diopter could be a much more reasonable alternative for close up work.

Skorj

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #16 on: January 03, 2010, 03:00:32 AM »
do you have any experience with the Hoya diopter kit?  The proprietary close up spacers have been fetching quite a premium at Ebay lately so it seems the diopter could be a much more reasonable alternative for close up work.

Sorry! The only diopters I have seen are those in the Japanese 600SE scientific catalog as above (an appendix to some 600SE sold in Japan). They appear to be matched for use with the 127mm lens, and would negate the need to use a ground glass back. But, you can only photograph an object within very tight tolerances (as per photograph above) - microscope slides, watch ebauche, etc.

I've never seen a set for sale either. I would stick to hunting down the back spacer set & ground glass - more versatile. I've had three or four sets pass across my work-bench, though as the last set I sold was over \60,000 I can see why alternatives are attractive! Skj.

SoonerBJJ

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #17 on: January 12, 2010, 12:51:34 AM »
Thanks, Skorj.

I found this data for the 127mm with the Hoya diopter set.  Attributed to "unclear" at Flickr http://www.flickr.com/groups/714967@N22/discuss/72157622480699051/.

600se with Hoya 55mm Diopter lens set including +1 +2 +3 diopters

127mm lens (shortest focus distance 3.5 feet)
with diopters:
+1 = 19" to 36"
+2 = 13" to 19"
+3 = 10" to 13"
+4 = 8" to 10"
+5 = 6" to 8"
+6 = 5.5" to 6.5"


I picked up the same set of Hoya diopters from Ebay and I'm looking forward to testing them out.  unclear and others seem to have had good results so I'm hopeful.  Here's to a much more economical alternative to the backs.  I'll post my results later.

mynah

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #18 on: February 24, 2010, 08:56:00 PM »
I have the 600SE and some 55mm close up filters like the hoya set. Can I shoot with just the filter on, or do I need to get the ground glass to focus?

Skorj

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #19 on: February 25, 2010, 01:40:10 AM »
You will need either a tape measure, or ground glass I suspect. Unless you know your focus point, which you can of course resolve through trial-and-error too.

Good luck!

This-is-damion

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #20 on: March 01, 2010, 10:41:46 AM »
Hi,

My 600SE has developed a sticky cable release.  The bit that fits onto the lens doesnt retract at times and as such keeps the shutter open or the shutter doesnt cock properly.

Any idea of best way to sort this out?  i dont want to be messing around with this too much.

 

[Sorry, image deleted during forum software upgrade. Please re-upload if so inclined.]

Skorj

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #21 on: March 01, 2010, 11:01:13 AM »
Any idea of best way to sort this out? 

Does it stick when un-screwed from the lens and laying straight out on your table? If so, you can try straightening the kinks the shutter releases sometimes develop. But, this can sometimes make it worse, so bend carefully. You may be better off removing cable from sheath before you start to ensure you do not impart a worse bend on the inside.

To do this, you will need to pull apart the handle. An easy exercise when you realize their is also a screw under the base plate of the shoe on top of the grip. Remove this (slides backwards out of the shoe), and the grips falls into two parts.

If the cable is sticky only when screwed into a lens, then try a half turn on the mounting end so the shutter cable projects against the lens shutter lever at a different angle. The final few cm of the cable has an appropriate bend to assist in the correct angle mating to the shutter release lever on the lens.

If none of this works, you will need to replace whole cable, or unscrew, discard and trip the lens manually. Good luck! Skj.

Francois

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #22 on: March 01, 2010, 04:11:12 PM »
I would think cable too. I have a few extra long cables which tend to grip when slightly twisted.
While oil should stay far from shutters, you could try dripping a bit of silicone lube down the inside of the cable. This oil is very light and might fix the sticking problem at a lower cost than replacing the cable.
Francois

Film is the vinyl record of photography.

This-is-damion

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #23 on: March 10, 2010, 08:29:05 AM »
After some investigation, the cable is kinked badly. 

Unscrewed from lens and straightned it does work fine,  but the moment yu try and bend it round again -the kinks reappear and its stuck.

I take it I can buy a replacement cable on evil bay? 

Either that or i will go the manual trip route...  as its going straight on ebay...... this is surplus to requirements as i find the 127 lens too middle ground (as this article says)   



« Last Edit: March 10, 2010, 08:31:30 AM by This-is-damion »

psmith2383

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #24 on: March 23, 2010, 04:38:53 AM »
I do have a question about cleaning the rollers on the 600SE.   I bought a used film back and the rollers seem smooth and not pitted but there is a brownish glop on both ends of the rollers and roller housing as well as the side of the case door.  Rather than do damage to the back, what would be the best way to clean the roller and door area.  What do you use, like a toothbrush?  Any cleaning materials?   What about use of any sillicone lubricant?  The rollers at present do not move.  With cleaning I hope rollers will move with ease.  Back seems well cared for but dirty in this one area with old development liquid.  Any help will be very much appreciated.  Phil

Skorj

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #25 on: March 23, 2010, 04:57:40 AM »
Hey Phil. The roller assembly pops out from the back in one smooth move. Yank the metal part furthest from the rollers away from the back. It will just go 'click' and pop out.

Then soak the whole assembly in water like granny's dentures beside the bed (better looking though). Get an old tea-towel and rub clean. Turning rollers as you go.

No lubrication should be needed. One roller generally turns easier than the other. The now wet tea-towel can be used to clean the rest of the back.

Reinsert, claim you know nothing of dirty tea-towel to partner, and you're away! Skj.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2010, 05:00:49 AM by Skorj »

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #26 on: March 24, 2010, 04:42:14 AM »
Here is my blog post comparing the 600SE with the Mamiya Universal.

http://moominsean.blogspot.com/2010/02/mamiya-universal-vs-polaroid-600se.html

So now people can follow my links to this and then this back to my article...an eternal loop.

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« Last Edit: March 24, 2010, 04:44:40 AM by moominsean »
"A world without Polaroid is a terrible place."
                                                                  - John Waters


Skorj

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #27 on: March 25, 2010, 12:11:38 AM »
So now people can follow my links to this and then this back to my article...an eternal loop.

That should keep everyone amused for hours! Great stuff... Skj.

moominsean

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #28 on: March 25, 2010, 04:21:36 AM »
Hey Phil. The roller assembly pops out from the back in one smooth move. Yank the metal part furthest from the rollers away from the back. It will just go 'click' and pop out.

Then soak the whole assembly in water like granny's dentures beside the bed (better looking though). Get an old tea-towel and rub clean. Turning rollers as you go.

No lubrication should be needed. One roller generally turns easier than the other. The now wet tea-towel can be used to clean the rest of the back.

Reinsert, claim you know nothing of dirty tea-towel to partner, and you're away! Skj.

i find that toothpicks work quite well for getting the bits of gunk out of the crevices alongside the rollers...for particularly gunked-up works (from extra goopy film packs)...
"A world without Polaroid is a terrible place."
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Skorj

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #29 on: April 05, 2010, 04:54:34 AM »
It fits, but the screen is actually plastic. I assume this is ok?
Well, plastic or glass should not make any difference, but the opacity should. If it is transparent, then an image will be difficult to see on the glass / plastic. Unless I am mistaken, you should not be able to see through it, but just see an image projected on to it. Low light testing seems to be required!

I have no idea how to use it. Are there any tutorials out there for a focusing back?
Any regular ground glass focusing tute should be suffient I think. For the 600SE though I assume you're using some sort of macro extension device as well - either lens tubes, diopters, or back extensions? The ground glass should be used to replace the film plane for focusing, and it then needs to be removed for replacing with a film back for exposing.

Some ground glass backs are spring loaded and allow a single sheet film holder to be inserted into mount as it displaces the glass. Others though you will need to remove entirely - for example if they are not spring loaded, or if you're shooting pack film of any type.

A tripod is of course required to ensure your camera to subject distance does not change while you're messing with focusing and backs. A static subject is also required. But, I assume you're aware of these last two points... Good luck! Skj.
« Last Edit: April 05, 2010, 04:57:37 AM by Skorj »

moominsean

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #30 on: April 05, 2010, 02:49:03 PM »
using a ground glass is quite easy...i have one made out of an old pola pack that i can stick into the back. only problem with one like this is that you really need two backs to take advantage of the dark slide when in the middle of a pack of film.

like skorj says, it should be translucent/opaque (plastic is fine). you just look at the back of the camera while focusing...you will see the image on the plastic! only real issue is with ambient light making the image difficult to see. a drape or some kind of shade over the ground glass is pretty much a must on sunny days.
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This-is-damion

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #31 on: April 10, 2010, 01:03:30 PM »
Any have any experience of using a flash on a 600se?

I like using mine at gigs, but could do with some pop at times.


Skorj

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #32 on: April 11, 2010, 03:56:55 AM »
Any have any experience of using a flash on a 600se?

I like using mine at gigs, but could do with some pop at times.

Nope! You'll have to tread that path alone for the first time. No idea about sync speeds - likely all? The manual used to be downloadable from Polaroid.com for free. At least you not need to shoot a whole roll?

I can imagine a huge broomstick and massive flash-head. Good luck! Skj.

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #34 on: April 15, 2010, 06:18:54 AM »
My blog post about making an almost-full-frame Mamiya Universal 545 back. Same process to make one for the 600SE!

http://moominsean.blogspot.com/2010/04/type-50s-and-mamiya-universalheaven.html

[Sorry, image deleted during forum software upgrade. Please re-upload if so inclined.]
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moominsean

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #35 on: October 17, 2010, 11:26:33 PM »
Adventures of a 600SE.
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Skorj

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #36 on: October 18, 2010, 06:46:50 AM »
Adventures of a 600SE.

Ha! What a great looking camera. Here's the print shown there under the light-meter as well... Great memories! Thanks! Skj.

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #37 on: November 22, 2010, 07:21:58 PM »
http://www.circlerectangle.com/blog/archives/1491

Hey, have you seen this post on mijonju about a home made SX70 film back for the 600SE?

This might give you guys some ideas...

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #38 on: November 23, 2010, 12:01:34 PM »
ah, thanks for the manual there miller! and I'm sure the write ups from moomin and skorj will help too. arigato~

got to loan a 600 se and I'm about to bu a pack of film. had one shot left in the pack and my first impressions are that the camera is bigger than I thought and the film smaller than I thought. I guess I've never actually seen a photo of someone actually holding the thang :P
/jonas

chris_n

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Re: Review - The Goose - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #39 on: April 21, 2011, 08:22:00 AM »
when shooting @127mm with a 6x7 back -- how does one compensate and frame the shot via the viewfinder?

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Re: Review - The Goose - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #40 on: April 22, 2011, 11:57:01 PM »
when shooting @127mm with a 6x7 back -- how does one compensate and frame the shot via the viewfinder?

With a 600 SE I think the only option is to guess, whereas a Universal has masks available. Having not done this, I am only guessing. Sean may have a more accurate answer though! Skj.

This-is-damion

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Re: Review - The Bus - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #41 on: May 14, 2011, 04:12:59 PM »
Any have any experience of using a flash on a 600se?

I like using mine at gigs, but could do with some pop at times.


Nope! You'll have to tread that path alone for the first time. No idea about sync speeds - likely all? The manual used to be downloadable from Polaroid.com for free. At least you not need to shoot a whole roll?

I can imagine a huge broomstick and massive flash-head. Good luck! Skj.



job done.

Cheapo PC cord and a cheapo flash seemed to do the trick ok.

Goop scans...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/thisisrice/sets/72157626717667812/with/5718402737/


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Re: Review - The Goose - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #42 on: May 29, 2011, 01:45:35 PM »
Great shots Skorj!! Love the one on the bike, Where is that Cute Obasan photo :)
its amazing, I think after i win those adapter to modify the back, I will start making some :)
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Skorj

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Re: Review - The Goose - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #43 on: May 29, 2011, 04:55:31 PM »
Where is that Cute Obasan photo :)


Here! Thanks for a great day out...



It's an easy job to make. Skj.

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Re: Review - The Goose - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #44 on: May 30, 2011, 03:37:04 PM »
how do you say..? kawaii nee! ;D
/jonas

bitnaut

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Re: Review - The Goose - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #45 on: July 26, 2011, 08:07:52 PM »
Anyone attempt to put the Diana Instant Back onto the 600SE?

http://canada.shop.lomography.com/cameras/diana-f-cameras/diana-f-accessories/diana-instant-back

It'd be an interesting way to get a manual camera to use Fuji Instax film!

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Re: Review - The Goose - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #46 on: July 27, 2011, 09:19:27 AM »
Anyone attempt to put the Diana Instant Back onto the 600SE?


Indeed. But, the size of the Instax would make it kind of a waste. A smaller machine makes a better option perhaps:



There's a few such conversion here in the Articles section. I'd like to see the results! Skj.

bitnaut

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Re: Review - The Goose - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #47 on: July 30, 2011, 07:33:29 PM »
Oooo very nice!

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Re: Review - The Goose - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #48 on: September 12, 2011, 04:40:53 PM »
i want to buy a 600 SE (or maybe a non SE) but i'm wearing glasses. Is the finder good to use with glasses?
Thanks for your answers...

(sorry my english is bad)

Skorj

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Re: Review - The Goose - Polaroid 600 SE `Professional`.
« Reply #49 on: September 13, 2011, 12:41:47 AM »
i want to buy a 600 SE (or maybe a non SE) but i'm wearing glasses. Is the finder good to use with glasses?
Thanks for your answers...

I wear glasses. I have no problems. It would depend I suppose on your ability to close focus on the RF-spot...